Appendix A

The Stag Diary - Passage to Colonial Adelaide 1850


 

Appendix A

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Note:

 

Passenger List Compilation

This passenger listing was derived from several sources including:

 

• a micro-fiche copy of the Stag passenger list held by the National Library of Australia;

 

• a micro-fiche copy of the ‘Surgeon’s Return of the Distribution of Emigrants by the Ship Stag’;

 

• a copy of a passenger list obtained from the South Australian Maritime Museum;

 

• a copy of a passenger list (Certificate of Final Departure) provided by the South Australian Archives (Services SA); and

 

• a newspaper record dated 12 June 1850 from the South Australian Register announcing passengers arriving on board the

 

Three of these sources are copies of original documents, which were of course handwritten. While the handwriting is faint in some places I am reasonably confident that my transcription is accurate. I have tried to retain the spellings and abbreviations exactly as contained in these documents. In addition to the problem of illegible writing I also encountered difficulties in compiling a list of passengers because:

 

• the contents of each list consulted was slightly different; and

 

• various sources which contain basic details of journeys that vessels made during the nineteenth century gave a different total number of passengers who made the 1850 journey on the Stag (For example: Sexton, R T. Shipping Arrivals and Departures, SA, gave the number as 250; Log of Logs, Volumes 1 and 2 indicates that there were 300 “migrants”; Francis Taylor records in his diary that 114 passengers commenced the journey at Deptford and were joined by “upwards of 150” more at Plymouth, (giving approximately 264 passengers). The above list includes 257 passengers (184 as families, 52 single males and 22 single females). There were 40 crewmembers on the 1850 voyage and I believe that they were included in some of the “passenger”counts, thus giving the figure of approximately 300.

 

Deaths During the Passage

There were 8 deaths during the passage to Adelaide as follows:

• 6 children (aged from infancy to 3 years);

• a single male (aged 20 years – Taylor does not record this death in his diary); and

• a married woman (aged 52 years).

They are all marked in the above passenger list with an asterisk (*). There was also one stillbirth to a woman who fell during the passage.

 

Doug Limbrick